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Was there a USPCC museum catalog?

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Was there a USPCC museum catalog?
« on: April 21, 2017, 05:43:32 AM »
 

Worst Bower

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The USPCC ended public access to their private collection back in 2001. I never had a chance to visit it. Was a catalog ever produced for this collection? I can only find Hargrave's 1930 "A History of Playing Cards..." as the closest thing to a catalog but it had no reference numbers to each deck.
 

Re: Was there a USPCC museum catalog?
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2017, 04:50:58 AM »
 

Don Boyer

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The USPCC ended public access to their private collection back in 2001. I never had a chance to visit it. Was a catalog ever produced for this collection? I can only find Hargrave's 1930 "A History of Playing Cards..." as the closest thing to a catalog but it had no reference numbers to each deck.

I honestly don't know.  I do know that, unfortunate as it sounds, I was told that the museum was basically "raided" by the company staff not long after the closing and that most of what was there, no longer is.

I do recall there was a museum that held an exhibit of USPC decks that was provided by the company, but for the life of me I can't remember which one it was.  Maybe an exercise of your "Google Fu" skills will help you uncover it?  That exhibit, at the least, might have a catalog.
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Re: Was there a USPCC museum catalog?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 05:14:50 PM »
 

variantventures

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When I contacted the company about two years ago they informed me the collection had been carefully boxed up and sent to storage and was still complete.  The Catherine Perry Hargrave book was suggested as the best catalog of the collection.